Program
Title I, Part C

Eligible migratory students served by type of service

Data for that selection is not available.

Data Notes

Applicable School Years Applicable States File Spec Data Group State Note
2016-2017 NORTH CAROLINA 121 634

Decline in numbers is 13%. This decline can be explained by a variety of reasons. 
1)    Several counties in southeastern part of North Carolina were devastated by Hurricane Matthew. The southeast contains the majority of NC Migrant Education Programs (MEPs) largest LEA-based programs. The storm hit during the normal sweet potato harvest time. Due to a particularly rainy season in September, there was no chance to begin the harvest before Matthew arrived. There was a $400 million loss in field crops in North Carolina due to the storm. After the storm, there was little work available and many families were displaced due to damage to their homes or camps. This lack of housing and loss of crops also discouraged many families from migrating to NC during 2016. 
2)    Our largest LEA-based program, in Bladen County and three other  blueberry  counties (Sampson, Pender, and Duplin) lost children due to a highly shortened blueberry season. A late freeze ruined much of the blueberry crop. Many families skipped North Carolina when they migrated or came and only stayed for a couple of weeks after realizing that there was little work available. This was evidenced by Bladen County's normally large two-school summer program having to consolidate into one school due to low student enrollment.
3)    There continues to be a shift to hire H-2A workers instead of families. Our largest LEA-based program county has seen all but two of its ten largest labor camps transition from family housing to H-2A housing. This trend is statewide, as the number of H-2A jobs certified in North Carolina increased by 14% from SY2015 to SY2016. This trend has caused a shift in program demographics as programs begin to see more out-of-school youth (OSY) and fewer children under 16.

2016-2017 OHIO 121 634

The -10.7% difference between the 2015-2016 data and the 2016-2017 data has been verified as correct. The significant decrease in the number of eligible migrant children can be attributed in part to many migrant families making interstate moves out of Ohio but not returning to the state. Additionally, fewer migrant families are coming to Ohio for work, and an increasing number of farmers are employing more H2A workers instead of families.

2016-2017 SOUTH CAROLINA 121 634

Counts have decreased from 697 in SY 2015-16 to 538 in SY 16-17.

The South Carolina Department of Agriculture indicated that between 80-90% of the peach crop was destroyed by a late freeze between April 6-7 of 2017. South Carolina is #2 behind California as the largest producer of fresh peaches and the resulting crop loss led to a large drop in our numbers of Out-of-School Youth and some families as well.

Furthermore, tomato production was down in the Lowcountry region of South Carolina (Beaufort, Charleston and Colleton) due to an oversaturated market (farmers cannot compete with the low prices) and fewer workers and their families were present during the picking season. 

Political climate played a major role in the decrease in mobility among families- this is based on information we received from families in Parent Advisory Councils and rapport with families and service providers and recruiters.

2016-2017 SOUTH DAKOTA 121 634

The Demkota beef plant in Aberdeen has stayed open and Dakota Provisions turkey plant in Huron is expanding.This has allowed for families to stay in their communities.  We have had more workers move into the northeastern part of the state to work at dairies due to the Babybel Cheese factory in Brookings.

2016-2017 TENNESSEE 121 634

Tennessee's category 1 child count decreased from 1,329 students in 2015-16 to 1,058 students in 2016-17 due to several factors including a decrease in the number of large-scale tobacco producers and a decline in tomato production.  In addition, the continued availability of jobs in the state's thriving construction sector decreased participation in agriculture, nurseries, and other qualifying activities.

Percentage of Eligible Students that are Eligible and Served by the Migrant Education Program
United States
337

Funding

Program funding over time

Participation

Number of eligible and served migratory students over time

Performance

Average proficiency gap between all students and migratory students

Dashboard Data Notes

Participation Data Notes
Applicable School Years Applicable States File Spec Data Group State Note
2016-2017 NORTH CAROLINA 121 634

Decline in numbers is 13%. This decline can be explained by a variety of reasons. 
1)    Several counties in southeastern part of North Carolina were devastated by Hurricane Matthew. The southeast contains the majority of NC Migrant Education Programs (MEPs) largest LEA-based programs. The storm hit during the normal sweet potato harvest time. Due to a particularly rainy season in September, there was no chance to begin the harvest before Matthew arrived. There was a $400 million loss in field crops in North Carolina due to the storm. After the storm, there was little work available and many families were displaced due to damage to their homes or camps. This lack of housing and loss of crops also discouraged many families from migrating to NC during 2016. 
2)    Our largest LEA-based program, in Bladen County and three other  blueberry  counties (Sampson, Pender, and Duplin) lost children due to a highly shortened blueberry season. A late freeze ruined much of the blueberry crop. Many families skipped North Carolina when they migrated or came and only stayed for a couple of weeks after realizing that there was little work available. This was evidenced by Bladen County's normally large two-school summer program having to consolidate into one school due to low student enrollment.
3)    There continues to be a shift to hire H-2A workers instead of families. Our largest LEA-based program county has seen all but two of its ten largest labor camps transition from family housing to H-2A housing. This trend is statewide, as the number of H-2A jobs certified in North Carolina increased by 14% from SY2015 to SY2016. This trend has caused a shift in program demographics as programs begin to see more out-of-school youth (OSY) and fewer children under 16.

2016-2017 OHIO 121 634

The -10.7% difference between the 2015-2016 data and the 2016-2017 data has been verified as correct. The significant decrease in the number of eligible migrant children can be attributed in part to many migrant families making interstate moves out of Ohio but not returning to the state. Additionally, fewer migrant families are coming to Ohio for work, and an increasing number of farmers are employing more H2A workers instead of families.

2016-2017 SOUTH CAROLINA 121 634

Counts have decreased from 697 in SY 2015-16 to 538 in SY 16-17.

The South Carolina Department of Agriculture indicated that between 80-90% of the peach crop was destroyed by a late freeze between April 6-7 of 2017. South Carolina is #2 behind California as the largest producer of fresh peaches and the resulting crop loss led to a large drop in our numbers of Out-of-School Youth and some families as well.

Furthermore, tomato production was down in the Lowcountry region of South Carolina (Beaufort, Charleston and Colleton) due to an oversaturated market (farmers cannot compete with the low prices) and fewer workers and their families were present during the picking season. 

Political climate played a major role in the decrease in mobility among families- this is based on information we received from families in Parent Advisory Councils and rapport with families and service providers and recruiters.

2016-2017 SOUTH DAKOTA 121 634

The Demkota beef plant in Aberdeen has stayed open and Dakota Provisions turkey plant in Huron is expanding.This has allowed for families to stay in their communities.  We have had more workers move into the northeastern part of the state to work at dairies due to the Babybel Cheese factory in Brookings.

2016-2017 TENNESSEE 121 634

Tennessee's category 1 child count decreased from 1,329 students in 2015-16 to 1,058 students in 2016-17 due to several factors including a decrease in the number of large-scale tobacco producers and a decline in tomato production.  In addition, the continued availability of jobs in the state's thriving construction sector decreased participation in agriculture, nurseries, and other qualifying activities.

Performance Data Notes
Applicable School Years Applicable States File Spec Data Group State Note
2015-2016 ALASKA 175, 175178179, 178, 185, 188 584

Data for these files do not exist due to the cancellation of state assessments.

2015-2016 ALASKA 175, 175178179, 178, 185, 188 588

Data for these files do not exist due to the cancellation of state assessments.

2015-2016 ALASKA 175, 175178179, 178, 185, 188 588

Data for these files do not exist due to the cancellation of state assessments.

2015-2016 ALASKA 175, 175178179, 178, 185, 188 589

Data for these files do not exist due to the cancellation of state assessments.

2015-2016 INDIANA 185 588

The data reported for ISTAR, Indiana’s alternate assessment, reflects the anticipated results from ISTAR for 2015-16 and are consistent with Indiana’s pattern of data collection. The data for 2015-16 cannot be reported as cut scores for the new assessment were not able to be achieved for this school year. Indiana’s Alternate Assessment took place, students were tested, but students were not graded and no proficiency levels were assigned. These students are included in the number of students enrolled but not in the number of students participating.